PRP for Hair Loss (PRP Injection Therapy: Side Effects and Safety)

PRP for Hair Loss (PRP Injection Therapy: Side Effects and Safety)

PRP for Hair Loss

PRP therapy is one of the many hair loss treatments out there, and one that involves what seems like a drastic process. The question is, just how effective is PRP for hair loss, how accessible is it to the average person, and what does it involve? We will answer those questions and more in this PRP therapy for hair loss article.

What is PRP Treatment?

PRP hair loss treatment, or “PRP injection therapy” involves drawing blood from the patient, processing it to enrich it, and then injecting it directly into the scalp. This vampiric process is not for everyone and is a little too morbid for some. However, there is a lot of science to this. There are also many suggestions that it is effective.

The abbreviation “PRP” is used to refer to the blood that is injected in your scalp, as opposed to the treatment itself. It stands for Platelet-Rich Plasma and refers to the enriched blood that is said to stimulate hair follicles, while also ensuring that the blood around those follicles is strong.

In laymen terms, your hair is like a patch of grass. For the most part, it grows well and it grows quickly. If the ground beneath has no nourishment, if it is dry, scorched and depleted of any goodness, then the grass will die. But if you add some fertilizer then you can promote growth once more, while also improving the condition of the once depleted earth.

That’s the theory anyway. But as you might have expected, it’s not quite that simple. There are a few problems with using PRP for hair loss, from the risks involved to the cost.

Is a PRP Injection Safe?

PRP Injection Therapy
This treatment can be—and perhaps should be—safe. However, it needs to be performed by a licensed and experienced practitioner. These days it’s too easier for anyone who owns a beauty business to start offering advanced treatments, whether they are legally allowed to or not, and that creates all kinds of problems, causing potential life-long issues for the patients and giving the treatments a bad name.

This is a treatment that should be safe, but it’s one that involves drawing and injecting blood; it’s one that can cause pain; and it’s one that lasts for up to an hour. There may also be topical anesthetic involved, as well as dedicated aftercare. All of this raises the chances of complications when PRP hair loss treatment is not performed by an experienced practitioner. It also raises the cost when it is.

How Much Does PRP Injection Cost?

How Much Does PRP Injection Therapy Cost?

Although PRP injection therapy is quite expensive, it’s usually cheaper than a hair transplant and it can be very affordable if you compare it to all of the money you might spend on shampoos, medications, supplements and vitamins. From what we can see, the average price of a PRP for hair loss treatment is around $1,000.

Even if you focus on the more respected clinics, you should still be able to get PRP injection therapy for less than $2000. To give you an idea of how this costs on the whole, we checked with a leading clinic that is based in Europe and works with patients all over the world. They charge just under $1,000 for PRP hair loss therapy. However, if you were to get a hair transplant that involves 1,500 grafts, which is one of the larger ones, then you would pay around $7,000. Even the smaller grafts cost in excess of $2,000, twice as much as PRP injection therapy.

How Effective is PRP for Hair Loss?

PRP hair loss treatment has been shown to be very effective, certainly when compared to other hair loss treatments that just don’t deliver the results you expect. It may sound like a bizarre treatment. It may seem alien, risky and even ridiculous, and it is all of those things. However, it works. And if you have struggled to find effective hair growth solutions then you won’t care how crazy it seems.

To give you a better idea of the effectiveness of PRP hair loss treatments, take a look at the following PRP hair loss treatment clinical studies.

PRP Hair Loss Treatment Clinical Studies

One of the main clinical studies performed on Platelet-Rich Plasma treatment can be found on the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health.

In this study, parents with androgenic alopecia were given the therapy to test how effective, safe and feasible the treatment was. There were eleven patients suffering from hair loss due to this disorder, and this included a number of patients that had been on a course of finasteride and minoxidil, without any notable results.

The hair was measured prior to every PRP hair loss treatment session, during which the patients were injected as four times over an 8 week period (once every two weeks). After the treatment had finished, the hair was tested for both length and strength, as well as the level to which the patient was satisfied.

This particular PRP clinical study noted a significant decrease in hair loss between the first and fourth treatment. Hair growth was also noticed, with total hair count increasing by an average of around 1/5th, or 22.09 follicular units for square centimeter. Not only that, but 9 of the 11 patients reported “negative” pull tests, which is to say that none of their hairs came out when pulled.

Microneedling with PRP

Microneedling with PRP

PRP hair loss treatment can be used with many other treatments. There are reports of this being used in combination with treatments such as finasteride and minoxidil, as mentioned above. Microneedling with PRP is also becoming very common. However, this is basically combining one somewhat dangerous and morbid treatment with another.

As mentioned in our Dermaroller Review, microneedling involves creating hundreds of pin-prick injuries on the face or the scalp. This is said to trigger a release of collagen, which is used by the body to speed-up recovery and may also help to create firmer, stronger skin, which potentially triggers hair growth.

Microneedling has been shown to be effective for skin conditions and can also help to improve the overall look and feel of your skin. However, it is not as effective when it comes to hair growth, which suggests that if microneedling with PRP does work, then it’s only because PRP injections are so effective on their own.

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